Developmental Challenges of Sea Power in Africa
Rated 3.5/5 based on 11 customer reviews

Developmental Challenges of Sea Power in Africa

  • Availability: In Stock
₦3,000.00
Hurry! only 14 left in stock!
  • Order within
Ask about this product
Your message has been successfully sent to the store owner!

Developmental Challenges of Sea Power in Africa departs from the work of most authors in that it provides an appraisal of shipping within the region. The development of maritime nations, through history, is influenced by the extent to which they dominate the sea, explore and exploit its resources, and ward off attacks from the sea. Drawing from the early canons of ideas on sea power whose insights shape the economy of most maritime nations, Africa’s maritime industry and their navies were examined.

 

Shipping is one of the most competitive industries globally, that is why critical attention is given to key issues such as threats to maritime security and piracy, and the ordeals of mariners at sea. Since trade is the foundation of sea power, the book examined the influence of African navies and other components of the maritime industry on global trade.

 

The book focused on ships, ports and people since they are considered the tripod on which a thriving maritime industry stands. While a critique of poor maritime governance, and shipbuilding capacity of most African nations was done. From all this, the question that is uppermost in our minds should be how to develop a vibrant blue economy using sea power in Africa.

 

So, how do we shape the future of sea power in Africa? The desire to see Africa’s maritime industry transcend the drudgery of mediocrity and assume its full potential remains the focus. Anyone genuinely interested in the economic development of Africa through the use of the sea should read this book.

 

Developmental Challenges of Sea Power in Africa departs from the work of most authors in that it provides an appraisal of shipping within the region. The development of maritime nations, through history, is influenced by the extent to which they dominate the sea, explore and exploit its resources, and ward off attacks from the sea. Drawing from the early canons of ideas on sea power whose insights shape the economy of most maritime nations, Africa’s maritime industry and their navies were examined.

 

Shipping is one of the most competitive industries globally, that is why critical attention is given to key issues such as threats to maritime security and piracy, and the ordeals of mariners at sea. Since trade is the foundation of sea power, the book examined the influence of African navies and other components of the maritime industry on global trade.

 

The book focused on ships, ports and people since they are considered the tripod on which a thriving maritime industry stands. While a critique of poor maritime governance, and shipbuilding capacity of most African nations was done. From all this, the question that is uppermost in our minds should be how to develop a vibrant blue economy using sea power in Africa.

 

So, how do we shape the future of sea power in Africa? The desire to see Africa’s maritime industry transcend the drudgery of mediocrity and assume its full potential remains the focus. Anyone genuinely interested in the economic development of Africa through the use of the sea should read this book.